Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Changing Plans on a Homestead

Photo Credit: Oakley Originals
I'm supposed to be planting my garden this weekend.  Or at least a good part of it.  This week I've been hauling soil around and spreading it around and adding manure to make it richer, all under a cloud drenched sky.  You can really tell the difference between the soil I've brought in and what's native to my area.  Our particular Backwoods are in the high desert, and the soil is dry, and while it supports weeds fairly well, I'm not so sure how it will support the crops I intend to plant.  Since our compost isn't ready, I brought in soil.


My beautiful, cloud drenched skies haven't really yielded much moisture.  Yesterday I took an umbrella to pick up the kids, and it caught maybe 100 drops over the almost a mile that I walked to get some exercise while waiting.  I expected some sort of storm, whether it would be a steady drizzle, or the batten down the hatches and get to higher ground gully washers that my area is known for.  Generally, in the spring and summer, it rains furiously for 45-90 minutes, big fat drops that leave the yard full of puddles and the main shed flooded.  Then the skies clear and the dry earth sucks up the water like a greedy, thirsty child, and it's like the rain storm never even happened-except in the shed, which, generally, will finally dry out just before the next rain storm comes.

We generally don't have periods of extended rains.  Sometimes our big storms will come every single day, which puts quite a crimp in outdoor entertaining or even grilling out.  Sometimes, they will come a few times a week, and we try to schedule around them.  Last year, we had about one a week.  It's never enough rain, and we sometimes feel like we have to coax the green things out of the ground.  About once a summer we get a full day of rain, and occasionally we get the remnants of a hurricane blowing up from Texas that gives us a good soaking, although nothing near hurricane status.  Those cooler days lead to a flurry of baking for fresh summer treats and maybe a surprise ham for dinner.  They are rare, but appreciated.

Photo Credit: Jo Naylor
Mr. Weatherman, with all of his toys and gadgets, tells me it's going to rain for three days this week.  If it was cooler, the rain would be snow.  Spring storms around here can be unpredictable.  Rain, a spattering of snow, or an all out blizzard.  While I'm thankful for the rain, and that it's rain instead of snow, I won't be planting my garden this weekend.

But that's how we roll out here on the homestead.  Changing plans are a part of life.  I can only imagine what it will be like when we add animals to the mix-which we had planned to do this year but changed our plans when we sat down and did the math on what it's going to cost to build fox and bear proof housing for them.  While Bellatrix the puppy is turning into a badass defender, she's still young and we're still training her, and I want to make sure that we don't do anything to encourage the wild animals that think we're putting in a buffet for them.  When we bought the property, we planned to add on to the house, until we discovered just how old the wiring and plumbing are.  Once the property is paid off, we'll buy a modular instead.  It will be cheaper to buy a used modular than to complete all of the add-ons and upgrades to make the house, home.  When my oldest son and I were planning the location of all the building and animal pens, we had to change that plan because Mr. Sullivan wants to keep the existing pull through from one gate to the other.  We planned to put the garden on the back of the lot, but we need to build a berm because the property has drainage issues.

Changes go on and on.

This week I've hooked up with the Rural Thursday blog hop over at A Rural Journal.  If you enjoy reading my posts about my homestead, stop by there and find some more great blogs to read!




14 comments:

  1. Hope next weekend brings sun, so you can get those seeds in!

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    1. So far, it's been good. Been tilling, hopefully we'll have stuff in by the end of the week!

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  2. we actually had some snow flurries in my part of virginia yesterday...i didn't see them but i felt the cold for sure!

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    1. It will probably get good and cold here (maybe even freeze) at least one more time, but we got plastic for covering the garden so hopefully that will be OK!

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  3. Oh, were always changing plans here. Thanks for sharing about your life.

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  4. Change seems to be the one constant in homesteading. Loved your post! Serenity ready to burst into action!

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    1. I don't think there's any other way to be. Can't fight the weather, or God, so you just have to roll with it. Not that I don't whine occasionally, LOL

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  5. Working with the weather is not always easy. Two years ago we had a cold summer and only got 6 tomatoes off of 12 plants. It was to cold to ripen and they all rotted. Hoping this year is better. Praying that you get the rain you need.

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    1. Thank you for the prayers, they are much appreciated! I'll be praying for your garden, too!

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  6. I love your writing style! :)
    Plans on the homestead seem to be ever changing, especially when having to work around the weather!

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    1. Thank you so much, Candy!

      Yes, they are always changing, but I think that's (mostly) part of the fun!

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  7. Take heart -- no matter where one lives, there's always an issue with the soil, or precip, or temps, etc... But you have a great attitude about it, so I'm sure your garden will be great.

    Thanks for linking up at RT this week, Mrs. Sully.

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    Replies
    1. That's true, Nancy, and thank you!

      I really appreciate RT, I'm glad y'all do it!

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